P Posted by Sandra on March 14 2018 0 Comments Dougie Poynter, INK., News, Photo gallery update

As we all know McFly is in a kind of hiatus right now and during this time Dougie has formed a new band with two friends, Todd Dorigo and Corey Alexander. The band is called INK. and has more of a alternative rock vibe, completely opposite as what we know Dougie for in McFly.
Read below their interview with 1883 Magazine and check some pics on the gallery!

[x16]PHOTOSHOOTS > 2018 > 1883 MAGAZINE

Dougie INKDougie INKDougie INKDougie INK

Dougie Poynter, Todd Dorigo and Corey Alexander are three mates with a lot of talent and have joined together to form INK. Each successful in his own right. Dougie, arguably best known for his membership in chart-topping McFly, Todd, an experienced solo artist with Glastonbury on his CV and finally, Corey, a Musical Institute LA graduate.

With a sound that can be described as a modern post-punk revival, INK. has all the ingredients for an honest and organic collaboration. We joined the guys in a London’s Covent Garden to talk about working as a trio, instant validation and what we can expect from debut EP ‘Heaven’ out now.

Introduce yourselves…

T: So, I’m Todd. Todd Dorigo over here.

C: I’m Corey.

D: I’m Dougie and a Sagittarius.

How did you guys get together?

T: Dougie and I would kind of meet, like bump into each other, on nights out, here and there in London over the last couple of years. Eventually, as musicians do, they eventually find themselves with some guitars lying around. That’s how we found ourselves writing very casually with no sort of goal. Fast forward a few months or so after that, we had all of these songs and we kind of found ourselves in a band and we thought we need a third. A rhythm section. So, then a friend of Dougie’s recommended Corey to us.

Did you [Corey] have to do an audition or anything?

D: There wasn’t an audition, but more a sort of… vetting process…

How did it feel being that third, final member, the final piece of the puzzle?

C: It was really nice, the way they approached it was really cool. It was making it a band. It felt really nice.

D: Yeah once we approached it, and checked out his criminal records- they were all clear. His medical records, they were all good. He was in. He had to pee in a cup to get into the band.

Did you know the name of the band before you became the three or was it a joint decision?

D: Did you (Corey) know what we were called before?

C: When we started speaking it was just… no. They had ideas and, we kind of finalised the fact we were going to do this.

T: I think we were throwing ideas around and INK. was one of them. We hadn’t decided.

D: It makes sense because it’s a three-piece, three letters. The reason for INK. collective was while Todd and I were doing a lot of our writing, we would talk a lot about this artist called Ralph Steadman, he did a lot of the artwork for Hunter S Thompson, Gonzo, early Rolling Stones illustrations. But, he starts a lot of his work with just a single splat of Indian ink and then has to create something from that splat. He never knows what it is going to look like which is kind of like how we were writing songs. Todd would come in with a riff and we would take it from there. There was never any like target of who we wanted to sound like, what we wanted to sound like. Every song had a life of its own like a painting.

How do you each keep your own identity in the band?

C: Allowing each other to have a voice.

T: I mean I just want to be Dougie.

D: And I want to be Todd.

What makes this work as a trio?

C: We all bring different things to it, we all have different influences.

T: I’d say I’ve written with a lot of people in the past and I’d say it’s quite rare to find someone that you work really well with. One of the reasons is our pace of writing. We give each other that space to breathe. Sometimes we sit with each other in silence, staring at the window.

I thought you were going to stare into each other’s eyes…

D: Out the widow, not into each other’s eyes!

I’ve written with tons of people before, but with Todd the pace of it was exactly the same. Coming from two separate worlds as well, Todd introduced me to a whole bunch of things I was not aware of before, it was just a lot of fun.

Dougie, you’ve come from McFly and then that turned into McBusted, what is it about collaborative work that you enjoy?

D: I’d say since day one, I’ve always done it. With McFly and Busted, both Tom and James wrote songs for each other’s bands so James would come over and write songs with us. I think it is a lot easier when you are writing songs for another band, you don’t get in your own head. I think every musician does it, seeing what another musician thinks of your idea and what they can add to it, especially if they are from a completely different world, it can take you down a completely new path.

Like peer evaluation?

D: Yeah, exactly!

odd, you used to perform solo, how is it different to now being in a band. What do you prefer?

T: All by myself… I think one of the positives I’ve definitely taken from it is in the writing process. Its instant feedback, the back and forth of ideas. For years I have just been writing on my own and you have to wrestle with yourself and you can go so far without anyone saying no that’s a bad idea or that’s great. There’s no one to encourage you so that is a massive positive which definitely made me excited to keep writing with Dougie. Just the experience of something as a group of mates. It feels like you’re in a gang.

D: And you can point the finger elsewhere if it goes wrong.

C: He did it!

You have a couple of EP’s coming out, what can our readers expect from these?

D: Well the first EP comes out today, that’s a taster but it just scratches the surface of what we have been doing. Then we are going to do another one and then put them together and create an LP. But as I said, we don’t know musically where it’s going to go. It’s just doing its own thing which is really nice again not to try and hit a moving target.

So, if I asked you to describe your sound…

D: Yeah that’s quite difficult. Other people seem to be able to describe it for us. We have heard so many different things. It’s so subjective, some people are like you’re Depeche Mode and then other people think we are this Post-Punk thing and we’re just like whatever, it is what it is. We didn’t go out to be like anyone, we are just doing songs that we like.

I was going to ask if you had any musical influences that you could hear in your own music…

D: Oh yeah, of course that happens. Naturally, you’d be like dude you like this sound or that guitar tone for one particular song and our producer, Jason Perry, when he got involved he had a whole bunch of ideas. We tore the songs down and then rebuilt them.

You had free reign…

D: Yeah, it was just a lot of fun.

That’s rare in the music industry to have complete free reign in what you produce, no?

D: I think so, maybe, yeah. I can’t speak for other artists.

T: I think when we started the band there was no record deal or anybody telling us. We didn’t have to answer to anybody so everything just started with the song and followed that through. We never had to think, we want our music to sit here. It felt very open.

Apart from the EP’s, what is your plan for INK. in 2018?

D: We’d like to play live, that’s the best part of playing in a band, playing live. The sooner we can do that, the better.

And if you saw yourselves anywhere in a year’s time…

T: Somewhere sunny.

D: Hawaii, damn it! If we’d tried to hit a moving target, we could have become this ukulele band and then that would have been our base, Hawaii. We are a British-based, Hawaiian, ukulele band. I think even if we are in this position still, able to make music then we can be very grateful.

INK.’s Debut EP, ’Heaven’ is out now and you can listen via Spotify here.
For upcoming announcements, head to www.InkWasHere.com or find them on Instagram @ink.washere, Twitter @inkwashere and Facebook@InkBandWasHere

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