Posted by Sandra on June 14 2017

Danny was a teenager when father Alan walked out of his life – and it left him devastated.
The Voice Kids coach was reminded of his agony during filming when a young singer spoke about the close bond he had with his own dad.

In an emotional interview, Danny said: “This kid talked about his dad. That hurt a bit.

“It was nice to see he had that but I didn’t have that. He doesn’t know me any more. I only had my mum there for me.

“Maybe if my dad sees that moment on the show it will be the moment he picks up the phone and calls me.

“I’d love to have a beer with him but it’s hard.”

Danny has been estranged from his dad since he was 18 and says he would love him to see how successful he has become.

He said: “I moved away from home at 16 and two years after that my dad left. It was hard for me and I know my mum found it hard.

“He’s never seen me drive, he’s never seen my girlfriend, he’s never seen my houses. He hasn’t seen anything.” Despite being desperate to meet his father again, guitarist Danny, 31, says Alan should make the first move.

He said: “If you’re a dad then it’s your job to do it. It shouldn’t be my job to do it. It’s his. He decided to have me.”

Alan was not there for Danny when he was trying to make it in the music industry. But loyal mum Kathy has supported him all the way, watching him go from aspiring performer to chart-topper.

Danny said: “Whenever I used to start playing guitar she used to turn off Corrie. She used to love that show – she’d never turn it off for anything.

“Just having that support was amazing. She thinks everything I do is great and that inner belief has helped me believe in myself. Some kids don’t have that so I’m privileged to have that behind me.”

Danny is now one of the biggest stars on Saturday night TV after being hired by ITV for The Voice Kids.

He added: “My mum is biased so I know she’ll like it. That’s what’s amazing about her.”

The Voice Kids auditions continue next Saturday.

SOURCE

 
 
Posted by Sandra on June 11 2017

McFly star Danny Jones turned his childhood love of music into a chart-topping career. But the new judge of The Voice Kids tells Jeananne Craig how school bullies almost made him give up his passion

Danny Jones has topped the charts and performed to sold-out arenas as one quarter of pop-rock band McFly, but things could have been very different if he’d listened to the bullies who targeted him at school.

They took exception to the then 13-year-old learning to play the guitar, and their taunts almost led him to give up on his passion.

“I got spat on. I hated walking down the corridor with my guitar, people saying, ‘Oh what’s that, are you going to play us a tune?’ Stupid stuff,” the Bolton singer, now 31, reveals.

“I actually gave up playing in school.

“If I didn’t have the private lessons going on in the background, I probably would have given it up completely, if it wasn’t for my mum and my family believing in me.”

With his Instagram account depicting exotic travels, recording studio japes and Jones on stage in front of thousands of adoring fans, the upbeat star clearly had the last laugh.

“I knew what I wanted to be, and the kid that was bullying me is still probably hanging out in the street outside the same sweet shop,” he adds.

Jones is hoping to share his tips for success with the young contestants on his new TV project, The Voice Kids (a spin-off from the hit talent show The Voice).

He’ll join the coaching panel alongside Black Eyed Peas star will.i.am and singer Pixie Lott for the show, which aims to find some of Britain’s best young vocal talents and will follow a similar format to the grown-up version, with blind auditions and spinning chairs.

Given that the competition is open to children as young as seven, striking the right balance between encouragement and critique is a challenge. But Jones insists he was pleasantly surprised by how well the contestants coped with rejection.

“We try and give them the most positive feedback we can, while trying to be as honest as we can.

“But you kind of vibe off how vulnerable the kid is feeling at the time.

“If they’re gonna break down, if they’re really upset, I always say: ‘Look what you’ve just achieved, look at the advice you’re getting at such a young age’.”

As we’ve seen on The Voice and similar shows such as The X Factor, being crowned winner doesn’ t always lead to long-term success.

So, how will these young singers cope if their careers fail to take off afterwards?

“There’s less desperation with these kids. They’re not like: ‘This is my last chance to make it’,” says Jones.

“They want to come on and share their talent. I don’t know if many of them really know what they want to do yet; that’s what’s amazing, we can get on to that and help them become that.”

The somewhat eccentric will.i.am is particularly good at talking to the kids on their level, Jones says with a laugh.

“He’s like: ‘Imagine you’re in a rocket ship and you’re going to Mars, that’s all that’s happening here, we just ran out of petrol’ … Me, Will and Pixie have good banter between us.

“I understand him, which a lot of people don’t. And for Pixie, we’re like the two annoying brothers.”

Formed in 2004, McFly – Jones, Harry Judd, Dougie Poynter and Tom Fletcher – reached number one with their debut single, 5 Colours In Her Hair, and went on to sell more than 10 million albums.

But despite enjoying fame and fortune with the band, Jones’s late teens were also marked by his parents’ divorce.

“The whole magic of family just got broken. To break something that was so magical and was a structure and a base for you, and just to see your mum so upset, is a hard thing,” he reveals.

In the trailer for The Voice Kids, we see Jones reduced to tears by one contestant whose story had personal resonances for him.

“It was the singing, the fact that I didn’t turn, and the story that came afterwards. He was kind of talking about his dad leaving him. I was like, ‘Mate, my dad did the same’.”

Jones married model Georgia Horsley in 2014, with his McFly friends among the best men (“We’re like brothers,” he says of his bandmates).

“I didn’t actually want to get married because my mum and dad had a divorce,” he admits. “But Georgia’s taught me to love (marriage) again, and be OK with it.

“It’s a powerful thing; to have something solidified in your life is kind of cool.”

He might be happily married and in his early thirties now, but Jones still enjoys the occasional bit of rock star behaviour.

“We still have it in us; I have rock and roll moments with my friends to this day,” he says.

“I still like to have a good time and enjoy it … But we do drink green tea in the morning.”

SOURCE

 
 
Posted by Sandra on June 11 2017

I love the banter between Danny and Pixie, the McFly moment of the interview is a funny one, don’t worry Pixie there’s nothing to be embarrassed of, McFly are cool :P

 
 
Posted by Sandra on June 5 2017

Danny talked about the importance of shows like the voice kids to help young kids who want to be musicians during his interview with BUILD that you can watch HERE

[x8]OFFICIAL > THE VOICE KIDS

‘The Voice Kids’ coach Danny Jones has responded to critics who claim that the show’s contestants are too young to appear on reality TV.

The McFly singer will be in one of the spinning chairs when the programme launches next week, and ahead of the debut, he’s argued that getting the chance to receive critiques at a young age can actually be a positive experience.

Speaking on ‘BUILD’, he told HuffPost UK: “Obviously, [the contestants are] open to a lot of criticism but so is everybody. It’s a learning curve.

“If I had got famous, or been successful, at 20, it’s no different to doing it at 16 – I just would have learnt more at a younger age.

“These kids know a lot, their knowledge of music surprised me, the way they dealt with it, the professionalism, the work ethic, it’s all there. It’s really amazing, it shocked me.

“As long as they always have people around them who keep it positive.

“My mum always thought I was the best thing ever and I needed that, it was good at that age.”

Revealing a tip for dealing with success, he continued: “I just don’t read anything bad about myself, I only look at the good things and I think that’s the key because it does affect you, it affects everyone.”

Danny’s fellow coach Pixie Lott previously shared her take on the matter, also while being interviewed on ‘BUILD’.

She said: “[Starting from a young age] just set me up so much better for now, because it makes you have a thicker skin.

“Now when [rejections] happen to me – which happens all the time – it’s just water off a duck’s back.

“I’m literally like, I’ve had this millions of time. Whereas if I was just experiencing it now, I think I would find it really, really tough.”

SOURCE

 
 
Posted by Sandra on June 2 2017

So looks like we’ll have to wait a bit more for new McFly music according to this recent interview with Danny where he talks about McFly, The Voice Kids (that is premiering on June 10) and his new role as a Speakers for Schools ambassador.
Credit for all the pics to Jake Davis.

[x10]PHOTOSHOOTS > 2017 > JAKE DAVIES PHOTOSHOOT

There are pages and pages of embryonic lyrics in the Notes section of Danny Jones’ iPhone. I know this because halfway through our interview he insists on showing me, beckoning me over to his side of the table and tilting the phone’s screen towards me. He reads out some of the lyrics, looking up every now and again to gauge my reaction. “It’s poetry, isn’t it?” he says, after a pause. “I write poetry every day.” This statement, said without a hint of irony, could easily sound cocky. From Jones, it comes across as honest and endearing. And, in his defence, we have just been talking about poetry.

Inspiring children

The McFly singer – who recently became an ambassador for the charity Speakers for Schools, campaigning for better arts tuition in secondary schools – tells me he wishes he’d known how useful poetry and a good vocabulary would be to songwriting. If he had, he might have sat up a little straighter in class.

As well as encouraging children to pay attention in the core subjects, Jones is also pushing for better music lessons in schools, saying creative and musically talented children should be inspired to “dream big”.

A child who wants to become a rock star should be given the same support as a child who wants to become a doctor, he says. “There is so much focus on maths and science. A lot of good things come from creative arts and I don’t think we should lose it as a nation.”

Jones, who has been playing the guitar since he was six, admits that if he’d relied solely on the music tuition he was receiving at school he probably wouldn’t be working in the industry now. “For my work experience, I did joinery for the council. I went and fitted kitchens.”

He credits his hard-working mum, who paid for him to have private lessons, with his success. “When I got the guitar out and made a little noise, she would turn the TV off,” he says. “I felt like she wanted to listen to me.”
…keep reading.

 
 
Posted by Sandra on May 24 2017

Danny went to his old music school in Bolton yesterday to give some advice to the actual students. You can read a bit about his visit to the school below and also see some pics.

[x21]EVENTS AND APPEARANCES > 2017 > THORNLEIGH SCHOOL, BOLTON – MAY 23

We were extremely honoured on Tuesday 23rd May to have ex Thornleigh Salesian College student Danny Jones of McFly come talk to our students.

Danny – singer, songwriter, producer and now mentor – is a speaker for the national charity ‘Speaker for Schools’. He encourages the next generation in their ambitions through sharing his experiences so far in his career. Danny spoke to 250 students, Years 7-9, about his lessons learned on resilience, hard work and finding support in those around him along the way.

The talk was followed by a workshop with GCSE Music students, Mr Eccleshare and Mrs Birtley, helping them perfect their performance of ‘Forever Young’ by Bob Dylan – the same song he performed in Year 11.

As a member of McFly and now a mentor and coach on the Voice Kids, Danny has started sharing his insights with young people to help encourage them in their potential, and to not feel limited by their surroundings especially if they are passionate about making a career in music or the arts. Speakers for Schools was launched in 2011 to help state secondary schools and colleges across the UK access eminent, high-profile figures to help inspire and encourage their students from all backgrounds through free talks such as these. In 2016 the charity launched its Creativity, Arts and Culture in State Schools campaign seeing the top arts and culture figures speak to students to help encourage, demystify and demonstrate the benefits of the arts subjects for all students. The charity has arranged over 3,600 talks across the UK to date reaching over 400,000 students.

Danny Jones has said:

“I am delighted to be working with Speakers for Schools. I think it’s imperative that those of us who have had success in the industry give back to young people. One of the most powerful ways we can do this is by directly sharing the lessons we have learned and supporting their ambitions. By sharing how my journey unfolded I hope I can inspire other young people to be bold in pursuing their own path, whether it be in music or otherwise – and not to worry about failure or getting it wrong. That’s part of the journey.”

Mrs Alison Burrowes, Headteacher of Thornleigh Salesian College has said:

“We are absolutely delighted to welcome Danny back to Thornleigh Salesian College. We are extremely proud of all that he has achieved since leaving here in 2002. We have very fond memories of him being involved in our school productions and shows. We are very much looking forward to him having the opportunity to share his experiences with our current students and allowing them insight into his successful career. We are committed to encouraging all our young people to foster their creative talents and are sure that Danny will really inspire them to follow their dreams and to be resilient when faced with the challenges that the world throws at them.”

Thank you so much to Danny for inspiring our students as much as he did, it is a day they will never forget. And thank you to our students, who again presented themselves impeccably.

 
 
Posted by Sandra on May 19 2017

It’s 4:30 am and I can’t sleep. It’s not that usual insomnia involving tossing and turning for no apparent reason. It’s not the ‘Oh my God my heart is going to explode because I’m so wired and uncomfortable in my own skin from the partying’ type of insomnia that I haven’t experienced in six years either. I’m wide awake at 4:30 am because I’m a few hours away from sharing a car and sitting on a panel with the voice of God himself, Sir David Attenborough — later today, we will be previewing his new short film about the conservation of Richmond Park.

Finally I fall asleep. A few hours later I’m standing out front of my house, waiting for the car to pick me up. At 8:55 am, a sleep deprived mess of a Dougie Poynter, complete with a fossilized dinosaur poop in hand, steps into the car — I brought the poop along incase I ran out of things to talk about. At 8:56 am we arrive at Sir David’s house where he’s ready to go with his distinctive white whispy hair, dressed in a navy blazer with khaki pants. He greets me with a beaming smile and a very comfy shake, “Hello”. I remind him that we briefly met on The Graham Norton Show where I first admitted to him that I moved to Richmond after a Google search of his residence, which he thankfully remembers and doesn’t find too creepy.

To rewind a bit, shortly after getting sober and looking for a fresh start, I began to look for a new place to live. I sat at my computer and Googled “Where does David Attenborough live?” I thought to myself, “Wherever Attenborough lives must be the most serene and green place in London”. So after searching for the perfect place I eventually found myself living in Richmond, home of Sir David Attenborough himself. He was right. Richmond kicks ass — the park, the deer, the river, the Mick Jagger… it was the perfect place to move when looking for a fresh start; and today is the day I get to indulge in my adulation for both the park and Sir David.

Off we go on what feels like a surreal dream narrated by my childhood hero; the man behind Planet Earth. Within minutes, I pull out the dinosaur poop fossil. After a quick glance and a study, he tells me that it’s probably not real because dinosaur droppings would fall with a splat much like cow droppings. Sh*t! Five minutes in and, one, I’ve already used my wild card, and two, I’m realising I’ve been duped! Great. My voice gets jittery, my mouth goes dry, my lips are sticking to my teeth and my nose starts tingling. Thankfully he doesn’t seem to notice.
…keep reading.

 
 
Posted by Sandra on May 2 2017

Danny wrote an interesting article on the Huffington post talking about how important it is to support young musicians.

Some of you may know me, others may not. For those who don’t, I’m Danny Jones: singer, songwriter, producer and a member of the band, McFly. This summer I will be fortunate enough to be a coach on ITV’s The Voice Kids. My recent experience as a coach hit close to home, and made me want to speak up about the importance of why we MUST support our nation’s musically-gifted kids.

I read an article recently by Dr. Ally Daubney of the University of Sussex and she warned us loud and clear that music could face extinction in secondary state schools throughout England. This got me thinking and was a real concern for me. You and I both know that if music is not offered in schools, it’s also unlikely to be offered at home. We need to all join forces now in supporting our kids that want to be involved in music. If we don’t, we will witness a generation of storytellers and overall trendsetters come and go without leaving its deserved cultural mark on our great nation.

Although the threat of music being eradicated in our schools is becoming more real, we can still help the UK’s younger generation leave its deserved cultural mark on this planet regardless of this potential threat. I’m convinced that there are three actions we can take to ensure we are doing everything possible to support the potential in our musically-gifted kids. The first is being vocal about our support. Showing the kids that they are backed every step of the way no matter what, and that we believe in their dream as much as they do.

Secondly, we must re-educate the kids on what failure actually is, and thus why they should not fear failure, whatsoever. Thirdly, we need to help our musically-gifted kids understand how what they learn in school will absolutely apply to their professional musical art in the future. If we can commit to take these three actions, I am confident we can save the next generation of Beatles, David Bowies and Rolling Stones.
…keep reading.

 
 
Posted by Sandra on April 29 2017

McFly star Dougie Poynter is set to star in the latest film being crowd-funded on Cambridge platform SyndicateRoom.

Being produced by Boudica Indigo films, Kat and the Band will tell the story of a 16-year-old girl who lives her dream by taking a band on tour, despite having no experience of working in the industry and still being at school.

How Poynter, who has played bass in McFly since it formed in 2003, is unclear at present, but the 29-year-old has apparently been out in America trying to get his acting career off the ground in recent months, and this could be his big break.

Lead investor on the project is Ian Maiden, who has made two film investments in the past and is putting in £250,000 for this project.

To find out how you can get involved, see syndicateroom.com .

SOURCE

 
 
Posted by Sandra on April 3 2017

Watch below Danny’s first appearance on The Voice UK last Saturday to promote The Voice Kids alongside Pixie Lott and Will I Am.

[x2]EVENTS AND APPEARANCES > 2017 > THE VOICE UK, LONDON – APRIL 1

 
 
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